Nature is not natural and can never be naturalized — Graham Harman

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Hyperobjects Liveblog 13

Ahh, that's better...I'm sitting in Denver airport with a nice glass of Fat Tire, waiting for the plane to New York. I was pretty anxious about this first leg of the journey.

And I've been inhibited from writing any Hyperobjects this last day or so. As OOOIII impinges, I turned my mind to my talk and to my essay for Continent. And the gravity well of Realist Magic is calling me in, and I'm obeying...

It works well, actually. I've written an awful lot Hyperobjects and even if I space it for a few days I'm still on schedule. And when you have a lot of projects, you have to do what you most love in that moment.

And that turns out to be Realist Magic. I had a major revelation about temporality a few weeks ago and I'm going to try to work it in. Right now I'm wondering on the page about how Heidegger could have lost it so badly in the 1930s. It has to do with a crucial mainstay of the argument.

2 comments:

Bryan Sentes said...

How could Heidegger have lost it so badly in the 30s? I asked Gadamer, who answered: "He was a brilliant philosopher but stupid politically." The answer is the same as how most anyone who was an intellectual at the time was either a communist or a fascist. As Ezra Pound, another one who lost it, put it: "How they go wrong thinking of rightness." IS there any second-guessing History?...

Henry Warwick said...

He didn't lose it in the 30s. Fascism and Heidegger are part and parcel of the same trend - the cult of the machine, the cult of death.